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Tracy
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Posted - 11/11/2008 :  1:28:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

How are you honoring the many vets in your life today?

What does Veterans Day mean to you?
Is there a particular song, poem, prose or video representative of Veterans Day that is evocative of what Veterans Day means to you? Why not share it here.


While poppies are more appropriate to Memorial Day, when I was in elementary school we memorized "In Flanders Fields," the evocative poem by Lt. Col. John McCrae, a Canadian Army doctor in World War I. Remember that poppies grow best in fresh-tilled ground when you read it.

The "Buddy Poppy" drives by the Veterans of Foreign Wars, and a similar charity drive by the American Legion Auxiliary, go to help disabled veterans and their families and stem directly from that WW I poem.

Some of the original traditions have faded over time. What had been Armistice Day honoring WW I dead was changed to Veterans Day in 1954 by President Dwight Eisenhower to expand the honor to all U.S. veterans.

Today people plaster yellow ribbon magnets to "Support the Troops" on bumpers, rather than wear red poppies on lapels. But the poppies remain a personal "thank you" for donating to the welfare of veterans and their families.

The day is known as Remembrance Day in Canada and Australia, more akin to our Memorial Day, and in Great Britain. They still hold moments of silence at 11 a.m. harkening back to the date's origins. What was supposed to have been "the war to end all wars" ended with an armistice in 1918 that began at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month.

In the U.S. Memorial Day is the day we honor veterans who have died; Veterans Day is the date we honor living veterans and those still serving.

Local veterans say there's no conflict between wearing the red paper or plastic poppies received in exchange for a donation to help veterans, on either Veterans Day or Memorial Day

In fact, says Gary "Frosty" Hulsey of the Washington state VFW headquarters located in Fife, you can wear them all year.

"We do poppy drives and accept donations year round. One hundred percent of all funds we receive have to go to veterans assistance programs," Hulsey said. Several posts are having poppy drives in front of stores.


TRACY

Vince Rush
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Posted - 11/11/2008 :  1:31:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit Vince Rush's Homepage  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

A few of my favoites

http://rushintl.smugmug.com/photos/292605648_ToHTM-M.jpg
http://rushintl.smugmug.com/photos/292605710_hHAdX-M.jpg
http://rushintl.smugmug.com/photos/301614079_8aAii-M.jpg
http://rushintl.smugmug.com/photos/301049449_8f8Ca-M.jpg
http://rushintl.smugmug.com/photos/301627958_mRmAk-M.jpg
http://rushintl.smugmug.com/photos/169555474_gtQpt-M-1.jpg
http://rushintl.smugmug.com/photos/401608285_UnUDN-L.jpg

Vincent Rush
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http://rushintl.smugmug.com
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Tracy
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Posted - 11/11/2008 :  1:31:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse


TRACY
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Tracy
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Posted - 11/11/2008 :  1:33:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

quote:
[i]Originally posted by Vince Rush[/i]
[br]A few of my favoites

http://rushintl.smugmug.com/photos/292605648_ToHTM-M.jpg
http://rushintl.smugmug.com/photos/292605710_hHAdX-M.jpg
http://rushintl.smugmug.com/photos/301614079_8aAii-M.jpg
http://rushintl.smugmug.com/photos/301049449_8f8Ca-M.jpg
http://rushintl.smugmug.com/photos/301627958_mRmAk-M.jpg
http://rushintl.smugmug.com/photos/169555474_gtQpt-M-1.jpg
http://rushintl.smugmug.com/photos/401608285_UnUDN-L.jpg



my favorite one

http://rushintl.smugmug.com/photos/301627958_mRmAk-M.jpg

Audie Murphy was a true hero

http://www.audiemurphy.com/welcome.htm

the most decorated soldier in WWII

TRACY
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arwendt
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Posted - 11/11/2008 :  3:34:25 PM  Show Profile  Visit arwendt's Homepage  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

Tracy, Great Pics.

If any of you are ever in the DC area a trip to the Arlington National Cemetery is a must in my opinion.

Looking for a good quote for your signature? Check out the Words of Freedom Blog
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monroegardener
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Posted - 11/11/2008 :  3:41:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

That and the Vietnam Memorial gave me goosebumps (getting them as I type, even).

quote:
[i]Originally posted by arwendt[/i]
[br]Tracy, Great Pics.

If any of you are ever in the DC area a trip to the Arlington National Cemetery is a must in my opinion.


Nature is ever at work building and pulling down, creating and destroying, keeping everything whirling and flowing, allowing no rest but in rhythmical motion, chasing everything in endless song out of one beautiful form into another. -John Muir, Naturalist and explorer (1838-1914)
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Vince Rush
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Posted - 11/11/2008 :  3:50:15 PM  Show Profile  Visit Vince Rush's Homepage  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

Actually, I took them. But you can see more if you go to my website and click on the gallery entitled "Vincent Rush"

Vincent Rush
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http://rushintl.smugmug.com
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Tracy
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Posted - 11/11/2008 :  4:44:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

I have been to the wall and the Korean war memorial. I took some pictures but i am not as skilled as Vince. Great pics btw

The best time to see the Korean memorial is in the early morning and if you see any fog on the ground it looks just like a rice paddy the statues are walking in. My wife have talked about going back to Washington and i would love to visit the national cemetery

TRACY
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Bretland
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Posted - 11/11/2008 :  10:01:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

I took a night tour of Washington a few years ago. What a completely different perspective. Everything lit by lights rather than the sun.

Every Veterans Day to me means thinking about my Dad. He served in WWII on the USS Card which was a small aircraft carrier. They served in the North Atlantic searching for U-Boats and escorting supply ships to England.

Now, I get to be a part of the Monroe Veterans Memorial committee. What an honor that has been and I get to hear some great stories from the WWII and Korean vets on the committee.

"There are 10 types of people in this world. Those who understand binary, and those that don't."
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Tom B
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Posted - 11/11/2008 :  10:24:38 PM  Show Profile  Visit Tom B's Homepage  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

Bob Bretland... What is the status of the Veteran's memorial? When will it be finished and dedicated? Are the forms for bricks on the city website? If not, where are they?

Tom Birdwell

Opinions written here are mine alone, and may not reflect the views of other board members.


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loaner288
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Posted - 11/11/2008 :  10:28:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

My grandfather was a medic in the South Pacific and Iwo Jima. He never spoke of it.
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Tom B
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Posted - 11/11/2008 :  11:15:26 PM  Show Profile  Visit Tom B's Homepage  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

quote:
[i]Originally posted by loaner288[/i]
[br]My grandfather was a medic in the South Pacific and Iwo Jima. He never spoke of it.



My uncle was on the Batan Death March in the Phillipines. It was a taboo subject for decades, then one year he wrote up his experience and began to share it with local schools and organizations. I spoke with him at length about it. What those men went through is still impossible for me to grasp, even after reading several books on the subject, and hearing it first hand from him.

Well over 90% of POW's held by Germany survived the war, which is an amazingly high number considering the grave injuries many had before upon capture. Compare that to POW's of the Japanese, where between one third and one half died, depending upon location. As bad as things were for POW's of Vietnam, it does not begin to compare to the brutility of the Japanese.

The major cause of death of Japanese POW's was disease, despite brutal punishment and mass executions of them at times. For several years after the war, my uncle had to sleep with his feet overhanging the end of the bed, uncovered. I forget which disease caused the problem, but it was extremely painful. He had cholera, beriberi, malaria, scurvy, and major bone damage from malnutrition. Like most of his peers, all of his teeth fell out. Even worse, after coming home, there was very little support then for PTSD issues. That really didn't come about until well into the Vietnam war. The greatest generation was left totally on their own with respect to what was then called "battle fatigue".

At the end of the war, the POW's like my uncle were given a dollar per day for their POW time. The US government blocked them from suing Japan for damages done to them.

Tom Birdwell

Opinions written here are mine alone, and may not reflect the views of other board members.


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Respector
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Posted - 11/12/2008 :  12:23:06 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

My Dad was a German held POW during WWII and he has said that if he had to be a POW, he was fortunate to be held by the Germans. The Japanese were absolutely brutal with no respect whatsoever for human life.....not even their own. Dad went about 50 years without talking but briefly about his experiences. After some encouragement by Mom he began to write of his experiences and he had a similar experience. The writing served as therapy for him and he began talking about the war to family. Now he speaks freely and has shared in detail his war and POW experiences.

We're so fortunate to have his story in writing. I know so many children of veterans who have lost their parents and have no idea as to what their service involved.

Thanks Dad.
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Tom B
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Posted - 11/12/2008 :  12:36:51 AM  Show Profile  Visit Tom B's Homepage  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

On a lighter note, my Dad was frequently promoted during WWII. He made Sergeant three times. :)

Tom Birdwell

Opinions written here are mine alone, and may not reflect the views of other board members.


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Respector
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Posted - 11/12/2008 :  02:00:07 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

Hah!
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yos14
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Posted - 11/12/2008 :  11:24:56 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

During WWII both my parents were locked behind barbed wire in internment camps (Manzanar and Poston). The moment they were allowed, my dad joined the Army and was part of the historic Japanese American 442nd RCT and lost a leg during the fighting to save the Texas 141st in the French Vosges Mountains - also known as the Lost Battalion. The 442 suffered over 800 casulties during those 4 days but saved 211 of the 275 in the Texas unit. He was also part of the unit that liberated Bruyeres.

The 100/442 is the most decorated unit in all of American history. I'm very proud of him and he is buried in the Los Angeles National Cemetary. GO FOR BROKE!!!!

Proactive, not reactive.
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SBK
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Posted - 11/12/2008 :  11:35:59 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

I loved to see in the Journal yesterday where a few columunist wrote about V day and what it meant to them and others but I found it odd that Clarence Page chose to write about Jessee Jackson.............kinda sad....:(
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Sunshine
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Posted - 11/12/2008 :  6:24:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

Both my grandfathers were in ww11. My maternal grandfather served on a ship as a "seabee". He in-listed. He did construction. I do know that he wrote many many letters to my grandmother. I asked him once about them. I said I'd like to read them. He told me he burned them when he got home from the war. He said what they wrote was between the two of them. I don't understand why he said that and why he felt they should be burned.

My paternal grandfather was in the army. He was drafted. He was a barber. I do know that he spent time in Europe. As a teen in high school, I found a french interpretation hand book in his basement. I used it many times while taking french in high school. I recently thought about this book and looked for it among my high school stuff. I knew back then that this book was very special and wanted to keep it safe. Unfortunately, I haven't found it yet. I often asked him questions to try to get him to talk about it. He would only answer simple questions like "when you were in the service did you ever go to England? He would never open up to me more than that, He'd just tell me that he didn't want to talk about it.

"The man may be the head of the house, BUT, the woman is the neck and she can turn the head any way she wants!!"
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Bretland
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Posted - 11/12/2008 :  8:44:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

Tom,

Here's a link to the form:
http://www.monroeohio.org/pdf/VeteransMemorial.pdf

The Memorial was to have been dedicated this week, but delays in the bidding of the work have pushed the dedication to next Memorial Day.

"There are 10 types of people in this world. Those who understand binary, and those that don't."
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Respector
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Posted - 11/12/2008 :  9:14:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

quote:
[i]Originally posted by Sunshine[/i] I don't understand why he said that and why he felt they should be burned.



Now think about it.
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Brandy
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Posted - 11/12/2008 :  9:21:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

Photobucket

My dad on the left.
Proudly served in Germany WWII
Taken in Germany

Thanks dad ;)

"Be who you are and say what you feel because those who matter won't mind. And those who mind, don't matter."
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Respector
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Posted - 11/12/2008 :  10:32:09 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

Brandy, do you know what Division he was in? Dad was in the 42nd Rainbow Division and I have done some archival work for their veterans memorial group.
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Brandy
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Posted - 11/13/2008 :  3:27:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

What a sad daughter I am. Right now I am not sure. I ask my mom and she doesn't remember. I do have a picture of him that was in his local newspaper when he arrived home. I "think" the information is there. Once I locate the picture I will let you know :)

The archival work you have been doing sounds interesting.



quote:
[i]Originally posted by Respector[/i]
[br]Brandy, do you know what Division he was in? Dad was in the 42nd Rainbow Division and I have done some archival work for their veterans memorial group.


"Be who you are and say what you feel because those who matter won't mind. And those who mind, don't matter."
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lpd6
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Posted - 11/13/2008 :  6:01:14 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

Tracy thanks for thinking of all the vets . being a vet of Vietnam and not getting any respect for many years I thank you very much and I know all the vets who serve this country say thanks.
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Tom B
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Posted - 11/13/2008 :  7:41:17 PM  Show Profile  Visit Tom B's Homepage  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

quote:
[i]Originally posted by lpd6[/i]
[br]Tracy thanks for thinking of all the vets . being a vet of Vietnam and not getting any respect for many years I thank you very much and I know all the vets who serve this country say thanks.



I certainly agree with lpd6 on this one. Thanks Tracy.

One of the most positive things I can say about our current situation is that we have matured somewhat from the Vietnam days. Today, the vast majority of people who hate and oppose the wars, respect and honor the soldiers, sailors, airmen, and Marines who we send to fight them. "Hate the war, not the warrior." That is a huge difference, as all of us old enough to remember Vietnam certainly remember.

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Houndog
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Posted - 11/13/2008 :  8:21:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

My grandfather fought through the Hurtgen Forest, with Patton's 3rd. Out of all of the family he decided to speak to me, maybe because he and I looked like twins, fifty years separated. He killed quite a few people, in the end, he regretted those killings. No matter your beliefs, killing humans is difficult, he told me.
He explained one killing to me which haunted him thoughout his entire life. And with this he expained that all of the commandments becomes empty when you break number six.
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Tom B
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Posted - 11/13/2008 :  8:42:19 PM  Show Profile  Visit Tom B's Homepage  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

Houndog, how old was he at the time of the war? After getting out of the Army, I had some difficulty with PTSD, and tried to read all I could find on the subject. The severity of PTSD is strongly correlated with age of the soldier, with youth being a bad thing in terms of downstream problems. It may seem counter-intuitive, but it appears to be a fact nonetheless. Given the same experiences, 18 year old soldiers have significantly greater downstream problems than 28 year old ones. Education has a significant role also, although I suspect that too comes back to age, as college graduates in a war zone are at least 22, and not 18.

As bad as PTSD is even today, things are much better than in the past. Our "greatest generation" had almost no support after WWII and Korea. "Battle fatigue" was something to keep hidden, and considered a weakness by far too many. There were no anti-depressants, and virtually no counseling. Today's VA programs are pretty good, if you can get through the high hurdle of getting into the VA system.

Tom Birdwell

Opinions written here are mine alone, and may not reflect the views of other board members.


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Houndog
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Posted - 11/13/2008 :  8:49:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

He was 24 when he volunteered, came back around his 28th year. He always commented on how old he was.
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blueblood
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Posted - 11/14/2008 :  07:10:06 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

Dad was in basic training on Dec. 7th and was in the second wave at Normandy. He made it all the way till March, 45, six weeks before the end of the war, when the last three whom had landed at Normandy were killed or wounded by the same mortar round. Dad's 45 belt saved his life stopping just short of his liver. The other wound went in his chest and was removed adjacent the spine in the middle of the back thus three scars.

A replacement at Normandy, Lawrence Nickel, kept good notes, later became a MD, and wrote a book about his WW2 experience called Red Devils. The book is priceless to read about my dad, as dad was his side by side Sargent and commanded this future doctor. He received multiple awards for service including multiple bronze stars. He would never talk about his combat experience except in general terms but from what he told and what I read, I have a pretty comprehensive account of what the greatest generation was about.

Let no man pull you low enough to hate him.
-- Martin Luther King Jr.
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Tracy
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Posted - 11/14/2008 :  07:29:51 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

quote:
[i]Originally posted by blueblood[/i]
[br]Dad was in basic training on Dec. 7th and was in the second wave at Normandy. He made it all the way till March, 45, six weeks before the end of the war, when the last three whom had landed at Normandy were killed or wounded by the same mortar round. Dad's 45 belt saved his life stopping just short of his liver. The other wound went in his chest and was removed adjacent the spine in the middle of the back thus three scars.

A replacement at Normandy, Lawrence Nickel, kept good notes, later became a MD, and wrote a book about his WW2 experience called Red Devils. The book is priceless to read about my dad, as dad was his side by side Sargent and commanded this future doctor. He received multiple awards for service including multiple bronze stars. He would never talk about his combat experience except in general terms but from what he told and what I read, I have a pretty comprehensive account of what the greatest generation was about.



Is the book called red devils? I will check it out and would love to read it.

I served from 77 to 82 and had the privilege to speak to many vets from the vietnam Ara. One of the officers i served with had been in a supply role and was attacked when his base was over run. He switched to the Security Police career field after he was saved by a policemen on that base. The stories he told were good for the young men in my company and for him.

TRACY
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blueblood
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Posted - 11/14/2008 :  07:47:37 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

quote:
[i]Originally posted by Tracy[/i]
[br]
quote:
[i]Originally posted by blueblood[/i]
[br]Dad was in basic training on Dec. 7th and was in the second wave at Normandy. He made it all the way till March, 45, six weeks before the end of the war, when the last three whom had landed at Normandy were killed or wounded by the same mortar round. Dad's 45 belt saved his life stopping just short of his liver. The other wound went in his chest and was removed adjacent the spine in the middle of the back thus three scars.

A replacement at Normandy, Lawrence Nickel, kept good notes, later became a MD, and wrote a book about his WW2 experience called Red Devils. The book is priceless to read about my dad, as dad was his side by side Sargent and commanded this future doctor. He received multiple awards for service including multiple bronze stars. He would never talk about his combat experience except in general terms but from what he told and what I read, I have a pretty comprehensive account of what the greatest generation was about.



Is the book called red devils? I will check it out and would love to read it.

I served from 77 to 82 and had the privilege to speak to many vets from the vietnam Ara. One of the officers i served with had been in a supply role and was attacked when his base was over run. He switched to the Security Police career field after he was saved by a policemen on that base. The stories he told were good for the young men in my company and for him.



http://www.thanksgis.com/thanksgis/temoig-us/lawrence.html

The double irony of all this is by coincident, Dr. Nickel was from the same small town in Ky. as I grew up, so I got insight to pre-war life in my community.

He also went back to Europe several times and videotaped the trail, and I have those movies made in the late 80's and 90's. His practice was in Tennessee, but he would always stop and see Dad when in the area. You could tell they were "a band of brothers". Unfortunately, they are now both gone. At Dads funeral, he called him the finest soldier he had ever known.

Let no man pull you low enough to hate him.
-- Martin Luther King Jr.
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