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Tom B
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Posted - 12/20/2007 :  01:24:25 AM  Show Profile  Visit Tom B's Homepage  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

The current Home Depot discussion again raises the need for awareness of the complexity of property tax abatements. An absolute abatement clearly has negative impact on our schools. But in most cases, an abatement comes with some degree of offsetting payments to the school district. This can even be an advantage to the district, as regular tax base increases reduce state funding to the district.

The current proposal for the Home Depot operation, while legally an 80% abatement, funds the district at virtually the same level as if no abatement was in place at all. These funds come in the form of TIF funding, and in annual corporate "donations" to the district. Note the donations are part of the negotiated abatement agreement, and are thus guaranteed. This funding can be used for special educational programs or put into the district's capital improvement fund without impact on its state aid. Financially, the Home Depot agreement is favorable to the school district. I leave it to others to debate if the community wants a warehouse operation in that location.

There are currently 8 abatement agreements in place in the school district. Three of these abate only tangible personal property, a tax the legislature has chosen to phase out by 2010. The others are:

EasyGo, 40%, 10 years, expires 2010
Kohls, 75%, 10 years, expires 2012
Worthington Steel, 65%, 10 years, expires 2009
Vandercar, 100%, 15 years, expires 2022
Mall Project.... I don't have that one handy, sorry.

Finally, starting in July this year, the school district gained the legal right to reject large project abatements over 50%, as is defined in a 1994 revision to Ohio Revised Code. Because all of the city's zoned business property was classified prior to that date, it was "grandfathered" under the old law, and the school district had no legal say in abatements until this year. This change occurred as part of the Vandercar agreement, with the city agreeing to put all property into the post 1994 classification. I believe this change had significant positive impact in the district's gaining favorable abatement terms in both the GM and Home Depot negotiations.

Tom Birdwell

Opinions written here are mine alone, and may not reflect the views of other board members.


Tracy
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Posted - 12/20/2007 :  07:44:26 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

Tom you also did not mention that if the city works out a 50% tax abatement deal the school has no say so at all. This was also agreed upon by the school district in the deal last summer.

As for the tif funds those funds are used to over come issue at building sites such as road widening and utilities etc.


TRACY
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murn89
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Posted - 12/20/2007 :  10:45:52 PM  Show Profile  Send murn89 a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

quote:
[i]Originally posted by Tracy[/i]
[br]Tom you also did not mention that if the city works out a 50% tax abatement deal the school has no say so at all. This was also agreed upon by the school district in the deal last summer.

As for the tif funds those funds are used to over come issue at building sites such as road widening and utilities etc.





Can someone translate? Forgive my ignorance but as a nurse, I am not familiar with any of this and until recently I've had my head buried in the sand living my life, working, taking care of people, etc...hoping the great leaders of our society would take care of us. Obviously that hasn't panned out so I had to wake up and get involved, and I'm a little behind. Plus, I get an instant migraine anytime the word "tax" is mentioned.

So if you don't mind taking time to enlighten me....

What is a TIF fund and does it go to the school or does it go to the city for the purpose of roads and utilities.

How much money does the school get? Does it equate to what we would have recieve without a tax abatement?

Annual donations for how many years?

If there's a 50% tax abatement would be still try and negotiate annual donations?



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murn89
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Posted - 12/20/2007 :  11:22:09 PM  Show Profile  Send murn89 a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

quote:
[i]Originally posted by Tom Birdwell[/i]
[br]The current Home Depot discussion again raises the need for awareness of the complexity of property tax abatements. An absolute abatement clearly has negative impact on our schools. But in most cases, an abatement comes with some degree of offsetting payments to the school district. This can even be an advantage to the district, as regular tax base increases reduce state funding to the district.

The current proposal for the Home Depot operation, while legally an 80% abatement, funds the district at virtually the same level as if no abatement was in place at all. These funds come in the form of TIF funding, and in annual corporate "donations" to the district. Note the donations are part of the negotiated abatement agreement, and are thus guaranteed. This funding can be used for special educational programs or put into the district's capital improvement fund without impact on its state aid. Financially, the Home Depot agreement is favorable to the school district. I leave it to others to debate if the community wants a warehouse operation in that location.

There are currently 8 abatement agreements in place in the school district. Three of these abate only tangible personal property, a tax the legislature has chosen to phase out by 2010. The others are:

EasyGo, 40%, 10 years, expires 2010
Kohls, 75%, 10 years, expires 2012
Worthington Steel, 65%, 10 years, expires 2009
Vandercar, 100%, 15 years, expires 2022
Mall Project.... I don't have that one handy, sorry.

Finally, starting in July this year, the school district gained the legal right to reject large project abatements over 50%, as is defined in a 1994 revision to Ohio Revised Code. Because all of the city's zoned business property was classified prior to that date, it was "grandfathered" under the old law, and the school district had no legal say in abatements until this year. This change occurred as part of the Vandercar agreement, with the city agreeing to put all property into the post 1994 classification. I believe this change had significant positive impact in the district's gaining favorable abatement terms in both the GM and Home Depot negotiations.



Tom,

Isn't the land that Vandercar is developing part of the mall project?
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Tracy
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Posted - 12/21/2007 :  12:23:22 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

quote:
[i]Originally posted by murn89[/i]
[br]
quote:
[i]Originally posted by Tracy[/i]
[br]Tom you also did not mention that if the city works out a 50% tax abatement deal the school has no say so at all. This was also agreed upon by the school district in the deal last summer.

As for the tif funds those funds are used to over come issue at building sites such as road widening and utilities etc.





Can someone translate? Forgive my ignorance but as a nurse, I am not familiar with any of this and until recently I've had my head buried in the sand living my life, working, taking care of people, etc...hoping the great leaders of our society would take care of us. Obviously that hasn't panned out so I had to wake up and get involved, and I'm a little behind. Plus, I get an instant migraine anytime the word "tax" is mentioned.

So if you don't mind taking time to enlighten me....

What is a TIF fund and does it go to the school or does it go to the city for the purpose of roads and utilities.

How much money does the school get? Does it equate to what we would have recieve without a tax abatement?

Annual donations for how many years?

If there's a 50% tax abatement would be still try and negotiate annual donations?







ok here is some of the information About tif funds and how they are used in ohio per the ORC:

Tax Increment Financing (TIF) provides local governments with a way to fund public infrastructure improvements (such as roadways, bridges, ditches, water, and sewer lines) that are associated with new development. TIF programs have been widely popular since states began authorizing their use in the 1950s. According to the Tax Increment Finance Coalition, 49 states have enabled local governments to designate TIF districts to finance public infrastructure in some manner or another. Local governments in Ohio are provided authority to redirect funds for such improvements through Ohio Revised Code (ORC) 5709.40-5709.43 for municipalities; 5709.73-5709.74 for townships; and 5709.77-5709.79 for counties

Because Ohios Tax Increment Financing program (TIF) is designed to encourage new investment, it is considered by many as an economic development tool. Similar to the Ohio Enterprise Zone (EZ) program, the TIF program enables counties, municipalities, and townships to exempt from real property taxation the new value added to a parcel or group of parcels as a result of new property investment. This, however, is the extent of the similarities between the EZ program and TIF. Unlike the EZ program, TIF can be used with residential development. Another difference involves the exemption associated with a TIF. The EZ program abates taxes, whereas TIF does not change the taxpayers tax liability or the valuation of the taxpayers property. Instead, TIF enables the taxpayer to make payments to a special fund in an amount equal to the property tax liability. These payments in lieu of taxes (also referred to as PILOTs) are used by the local government to retire debt incurred for the infrastructure improvements needed to support the new real property investment.

How Does Tax Increment Financing work?
Local legislative authorities exercise use of this program at their discretion. State enabling legislation provides the general framework under which TIF can be used, but local governments are afforded the freedom to decide where and when to implement TIF.

To use TIF, improvements to public infrastructure necessary for proposed new investment must first be declared to have a public purpose by local authorities. According to the Ohio Revised Code, public infrastructure is considered:

Public roads and highways.
Water and sewer lines.
Environmental remediation.
Land acquisition.
Demolition (including demolition on private property deemed necessary for economic development).
Storm water and flood remediation (including storm water and flood remediation on private property deemed necessary for public health, safety, and welfare).
Gas, electric, and telecommunication services.
Public waterway development.
TIF can be used to finance such public infrastructure serving new investment on one parcel or a number of parcels totaling up to 300 contiguous acres. A possible application of TIF is shown in the following example:

Assume a developer has 20 acres on which new homes would be built, but the proposed new investment would not be feasible without the improvement to existing roadway, water, sewer, or other utilities. Ordinarily, such infrastructure improvements are tied to a capital improvements plan, which is usually long-range in nature. If the community was in need of additional new housing but did not have financial reserves in place to finance the needed infrastructure improvements, local officials would be faced with quite a dilemma.

TIF provides for the exemption of taxes associated with the increased value of the proposed development. It also provides for the creation of a special fund (a debt retirement fund) that is designed to accept a portion of the new taxes generated from the proposed new development. Up to 75% of the new taxes associated with the increased valuation resulting from the new investment can be exempted for up to 10 years. With formal concurrence from the boards of the affected school districts, up to 100% of the new taxes can be exempted for up to 30 years.

If, in this example, 75% of the new real property taxes associated with the new investment are TIFed for 10 years, then the value of the property tax exempted (in this case 75% of the tax liability associated with the increase in real property valuation) is redirected, or Paid-in-Lieu of Taxes by the taxpayer (PILOT) to a special fund set up by the county auditor (see the example below). Payments to this special fund are drawn down to retire the infrastructure debt incurred by local government. PILOTs are made at the same time property taxes are due and cannot exceed the annual debt service of the notes or bonds used to finance the public infrastructure improvements.

Since TIF debt is not typically considered part of a local governments debt load, local officials may find TIF an appealing way to finance needed public infrastructure. Such infrastructure can be financed without asking residents for a tax increase. Likewise, a portion of the new taxes associated with new investment may still be paid. In short, improvements can be made to accommodate new investment without the political expense associated with short-term tax increases to fund needed infrastructure.

What Are TIF Roles and Responsibilities?
Local Legislative Authorities
(Includes Township Boards of Trustees, County Boards of Commissioners, and Municipal Councils)

Determine the costs of the public infrastructure under consideration and the value of the proposed exemptions (proposed exemption must generate revenue necessary to retire associated debt).
Propose resolution or ordinance declaring public infrastructure improvements to be a public purpose necessary for the development of certain parcels of land within their jurisdiction.
Give notice of public hearing at least 30 days prior to the public hearing.
Provide a detailed description of the anticipated improvements including estimates of true investment for such improvements to affected school boards when exempted amounts exceed 75% and/or district life exceeds 10 years this must be done within 45 days of adopting such a resolution or ordinance.
Conduct a public hearing within 30 days before adopting the proposed resolution or ordinance.
Adopt the proposed resolution or ordinance (townships: by unanimous vote).
Execute a revenue-sharing agreement within six months of adopting the ordinance (applies only to municipalities collecting an income tax) with affected school districts in cases where the new investment results in annual payroll for new employees of $1,000,000 or more.
If a compensation agreement is not reached within six months, ORC provides for a mandatory 50/50 sharing between the municipality and its affected city, village, or exempted school district
Submit TIF-related and PILOT agreement to ODOD within 15 days of enactment of the TIF.
Submit a status report by March 31 each year in which a TIF district is in effect to the Director of Development. Report describes such things as the public infrastructure improvements and housing renovations financed with redirected property taxes; changes in private investment resulting from the TIF; and a summary of payments made in lieu of taxes
County Auditor
Works with local legislative authorities to obtain the market value and taxable value of the proposed new real property investment.
Works with local legislative authorities to determine projected tax revenues resulting from the proposed new real property investment.
Property Owner
Enters into a contract with the local legislative authority describing the obligation to make PILOTs.
County Treasurer
Creates tax equivalent account to accept the PILOTs.
School Board
Approves resolutions that provide for exempted percentages of more than 75% and/or a district life of more than 10 years.
May disapprove percentages, term, or both.
Proposes compensation percentage in resolution to legislative authority within 14 days of formal approval of proposed resolution or ordinance.
Failure to certify such a resolution to legislative authority permits the adoption of the proposed resolution or ordinance with no provision for a compensation percentage for the affected school districts.
Conclusion
Tax Increment Financing provides local governments with a mechanism for funding a variety of public infrastructure improvements needed to stimulate private investment or meet growing community needs without raising taxes. The infrastructure financing program requires significant communication and coordination among a variety of players and levels of government, as well as analysis and planning. As such, the economic development tool probably ranks among the more administratively complex programs available to local legislative authorities. Many of the references on this topic cite the importance of working with legal counsel when working with TIF.


TRACY
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Tracy
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Posted - 12/21/2007 :  12:24:48 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

quote:
[i]Originally posted by murn89[/i]
[br]
quote:
[i]Originally posted by Tom Birdwell[/i]
[br]The current Home Depot discussion again raises the need for awareness of the complexity of property tax abatements. An absolute abatement clearly has negative impact on our schools. But in most cases, an abatement comes with some degree of offsetting payments to the school district. This can even be an advantage to the district, as regular tax base increases reduce state funding to the district.

The current proposal for the Home Depot operation, while legally an 80% abatement, funds the district at virtually the same level as if no abatement was in place at all. These funds come in the form of TIF funding, and in annual corporate "donations" to the district. Note the donations are part of the negotiated abatement agreement, and are thus guaranteed. This funding can be used for special educational programs or put into the district's capital improvement fund without impact on its state aid. Financially, the Home Depot agreement is favorable to the school district. I leave it to others to debate if the community wants a warehouse operation in that location.

There are currently 8 abatement agreements in place in the school district. Three of these abate only tangible personal property, a tax the legislature has chosen to phase out by 2010. The others are:

EasyGo, 40%, 10 years, expires 2010
Kohls, 75%, 10 years, expires 2012
Worthington Steel, 65%, 10 years, expires 2009
Vandercar, 100%, 15 years, expires 2022
Mall Project.... I don't have that one handy, sorry.

Finally, starting in July this year, the school district gained the legal right to reject large project abatements over 50%, as is defined in a 1994 revision to Ohio Revised Code. Because all of the city's zoned business property was classified prior to that date, it was "grandfathered" under the old law, and the school district had no legal say in abatements until this year. This change occurred as part of the Vandercar agreement, with the city agreeing to put all property into the post 1994 classification. I believe this change had significant positive impact in the district's gaining favorable abatement terms in both the GM and Home Depot negotiations.



Tom,

Isn't the land that Vandercar is developing part of the mall project?



No they are two separate projects by two developers. They will be neighbors and share the same access from the north and south of the projects.

TRACY
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Tracy
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Posted - 12/21/2007 :  12:29:16 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

quote:
[i]Originally posted by murn89[/i]
How much money does the school get? Does it equate to what we would have recieve without a tax abatement?
Annual donations for how many years?
If there's a 50% tax abatement would be still try and negotiate annual donations?




The deal will first be discussed with the school if the Tax abatement is above 50% of the property tax. The deal at the moment is being discuss at 80 % for 15 years. The school has the numbers that they have discussed but until the deal is presented to the city nothing it final. I personally think the Home Depot deal can be very good for the city. The deal will get further discussion and adjustments before it is final.

TRACY
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murn89
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Posted - 12/21/2007 :  12:39:27 AM  Show Profile  Send murn89 a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

Thank you for the info. It all sounds very complex and seems like it would be alot of work to manage.

It sounds like the city and school district have to share this money? If so, what percentage will be given to the school district?
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Tracy
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Posted - 12/21/2007 :  12:43:31 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

quote:
[i]Originally posted by murn89[/i]
[br]Thank you for the info. It all sounds very complex and seems like it would be alot of work to manage.

It sounds like the city and school district have to share this money? If so, what percentage will be given to the school district?



School board works out a deal on the tax abatement's and then it is passed to the city to approve or not. The total dollar amounts are not final but the property abatement that is being requested by the devoloper is 80% of the devolped land value. Of that amount, the school gets about 75% and the city about 15% as Bob Kelley mentioned in another thread.

TRACY
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Tom B
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Posted - 12/21/2007 :  12:46:41 AM  Show Profile  Visit Tom B's Homepage  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

quote:
[i]Originally posted by Tracy[/i]
[br]
quote:
[i]Originally posted by murn89[/i]
[br]Thank you for the info. It all sounds very complex and seems like it would be alot of work to manage.

It sounds like the city and school district have to share this money? If so, what percentage will be given to the school district?



School board works out a deal on the tax abatement's and then it is passed to the city to approve or not. The total dollar amounts are not final but the property abatement that is being requested by the devoloper is 80% of the devolped land value. Of that amount, the school gets about 75% and the city about 15% as Bob Kelley mentioned in another thread.



Except in this case it was a joint city/school negotiation, conducted in the city building. Staffs of both school and city participated.

Tom Birdwell

Opinions written here are mine alone, and may not reflect the views of other board members.


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murn89
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Posted - 12/21/2007 :  12:48:50 AM  Show Profile  Send murn89 a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

Thanks for the lesson... I can see why this deal would be beneficial to city and school. I hope it works out. Maybe with a home depot close by I can get instigator to get movin' on his "honey-do list"
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slapshot
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Posted - 12/21/2007 :  01:04:35 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

quote:
[i]Originally posted by murn89[/i]
[br]Thanks for the lesson... I can see why this deal would be beneficial to city and school. I hope it works out. Maybe with a home depot close by I can get instigator to get movin' on his "honey-do list"



Looks like he is free from having to move to quickly on that since this will be a distribution center.
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murn89
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Posted - 12/21/2007 :  01:05:45 AM  Show Profile  Send murn89 a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

Oh darn... I must have missed that part! Looks like I am never going to get my bathroom remodeled!
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Tom B
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Posted - 12/22/2007 :  01:46:59 AM  Show Profile  Visit Tom B's Homepage  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

quote:
[i]Originally posted by Tracy[/i]
[br]
quote:
[i]Originally posted by murn89[/i]
[br]Thank you for the info. It all sounds very complex and seems like it would be alot of work to manage.

It sounds like the city and school district have to share this money? If so, what percentage will be given to the school district?



School board works out a deal on the tax abatement's and then it is passed to the city to approve or not. The total dollar amounts are not final but the property abatement that is being requested by the devoloper is 80% of the devolped land value. Of that amount, the school gets about 75% and the city about 15% as Bob Kelley mentioned in another thread.



This is NOT a "deal" worked out by the school board. It was instead a tax abatement negotiation, run by a joint team of both city and school district top administration. It has been to neither city council or school board for approval. As I pointed out in the other thread, if city management is negotiating tax abatements contrary to the guidelines and view of its council, then something is wrong there. Calling it a "school deal" is not fairly descriptive of what took place.

Tom Birdwell

Opinions written here are mine alone, and may not reflect the views of other board members.


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Eagle
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Posted - 12/22/2007 :  02:13:59 AM  Show Profile  Visit Eagle's Homepage  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

Please explain what/who you consider "TOP ADMINISTRATION" "JOINT TEAM". Is this a secret team or do they have names? We the voters should have a right to know since your speaking of them and their actions taken place. In past tence.


quote:
[i]Originally posted by Tom Birdwell[/i]
[br]
quote:
[i]Originally posted by Tracy[/i]
[br]
quote:
[i]Originally posted by murn89[/i]
[br]Thank you for the info. It all sounds very complex and seems like it would be alot of work to manage.

It sounds like the city and school district have to share this money? If so, what percentage will be given to the school district?



School board works out a deal on the tax abatement's and then it is passed to the city to approve or not. The total dollar amounts are not final but the property abatement that is being requested by the devoloper is 80% of the devolped land value. Of that amount, the school gets about 75% and the city about 15% as Bob Kelley mentioned in another thread.



This is NOT a "deal" worked out by the school board. It was instead a tax abatement negotiation, run by a joint team of both city and school district top administration. It has been to neither city council or school board for approval. As I pointed out in the other thread, if city management is negotiating tax abatements contrary to the guidelines and view of its council, then something is wrong there. Calling it a "school deal" is not fairly descriptive of what took place.



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Tom B
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Posted - 12/22/2007 :  02:50:42 AM  Show Profile  Visit Tom B's Homepage  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

Tax abatements... what is the goal and result? They are used to attract businesses to our community, a good thing obviously. Businesses result in two major forms of local taxes. First, local income taxes, which are 100% city. Second, property taxes, split roughly 85% schools, with the remainder to the city and various county wide things like MRDD, social services, etc. Abatements are only applied to property taxes, never income taxes, so their negative impact is largely limited to school operations. Employee income taxes to the city are never abated. Very large business project abatements can change the traditional ratio of business vs homeowner property taxes. I believe it is clear that increasing local businesses results in downstream population growth. Without corresponding business property tax growth, schools are left with increasing student populations, and no comparable income stream except going to homeowners. This is why today the city and school senior leaders are working together to find ways to offset property abatements. Ohio revised code allows for sharing of city income taxes with schools when property taxes are abated, but to date, this has not occurred in any local property tax abatements.

Taken too far, abatements become legal money laundering. Business taxes were abated by cities, and in turn, the businesses agreed to fund the public infrastructure, roads, water, sewer, etc., necessary to support them. But the abated taxes came from schools, who until recently had no say in abatements. Downstream, the schools had to make up the lost income to fund the consequent growing student populations, and were left with no option but to sell the public on an school operating levy. The net result was that the public paid for the "business funded" infrastructure, just as surely as if the city had pushed for and approved a bond issue to directly pay for the infrastructure itself. This is why the Ohio legislature changed the law, providing schools an opportunity to veto abatements larger than 50% on large projects. This law became applicable to Monroe in July of this year. In fairness to the city, they did work to gain some tax offsets for the schools prior to this change.

I believe our school and city staffs are improving their ability to work together in this arena, and that with this joint effort, we can significantly improve Monroe's business base without great harm to the school district. GM was the first attempt, and was pretty clumsy. Home Depot is round two and in my view at least was much more a joint city/school effort. We will get better. It will take some time for this all to work out, but it will.

Tom Birdwell

Opinions written here are mine alone, and may not reflect the views of other board members.


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Tom B
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Posted - 12/22/2007 :  03:05:36 AM  Show Profile  Visit Tom B's Homepage  Reply with Quote Report Abuse

quote:
[i]Originally posted by Eagle[/i]
[br]Please explain what/who you consider "TOP ADMINISTRATION" "JOINT TEAM". Is this a secret team or do they have names? We the voters should have a right to know since your speaking of them and their actions taken place. In past tence.



Right to know? Geeze John you make it sound like there is a grassy knoll conspiricy going on.

I was not in the room, but according to the email Bob Kelly sent me during the discussions/negotiations, the city team included the city manager and I believe, the city finance director. On the school side it was the treasurer. Who else could possibly be city and school top administration? Joint team means both city and school were represented through the negotiations.

Past tense is used in the sense that it is my understanding that those leaders reached tentative agreement with HD, subject of course to board and council approval/rejection by a date in January I believe. I have no idea if either body will approve it, but it looks favorable to me. The city retains 100% of income taxes, a considerable prize, and the school's abated property taxes are largely offset.

Every other well managed city/district I know of works in exactly this fashion, with school and city top administrative working within parameters and general guidelines given by boards and councils. If that is not the case in Monroe, school district or city, something is wrong.

Tom Birdwell

Opinions written here are mine alone, and may not reflect the views of other board members.


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In Remembrance of Alice Rose Salzman
 
Prayer Requests
Prayers for Kenny Ellis & Family
Prayers Needed
 
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Main Street Monroe was started by Monroe, Ohio resident John Beagle in 1998